Reboot is a 28-day program at Lindner Center of HOPE’s Williams House for adolescents 11 to 17 (18, if still in high school) struggling with internet addiction. As part of Williams House’s 14-day comprehensive diagnostic assessment, internet use disorders can be assessed along with other potential co-occurring disorders. The Reboot program focuses on establishing moderated, controlled use of the positive technology of the internet.

Signs of Internet Addiction

Below are the most common signs of screen and technology addiction where the term “technology” means any internet activity completed on a computer, laptop, tablet, gaming console, or any other digital device:

  • The child spends vast amounts of time engaged with technology.
  • The child is constantly preoccupied by technology.
  • The child withdraws from social situations, preferring to use digital devices.
  • The child is tired and irritable because of inadequate sleep, and because of the overuse of technology.
  • The child announces that he or she is bored when he or she is not using digital devices.
  • The child withdrawals from activities that he or she previously enjoyed, to pursue activities only on digital devices.
  • The child’s school performance is compromised because he or she is focused on technology.
  • The child has lied or hidden the extent of technology use.
  • The child has become angry or disobedient when you set time limits on technology use.

The Three “C’s” of addiction also apply to the internet:

  • Loss of control
  • Compulsion/Obsession
  • Continued use despite the negative consequences

Comprehensive Assessment

Families seeking help with their concerns about their adolescent’s potential internet addiction can begin with Williams House’s 14-day comprehensive diagnostic assessment (CDA). In addition to the standard psychological testing battery that will help identify any underlying and/or co-occurring mental health conditions, patients will also receive an Internet Addiction Assessment and families will complete the Parent-Child Internet Addiction Checklist. During these 14 days, the patient will be participating in treatment initiation, including individual therapy and groups. For some patients, they will experience a detoxification from the Internet during this time.

Recommendations

Once the assessment is completed, along with the internet addiction consultation, the patient and family will participate in a Feedback Session with members of the treatment team. This session provides the results of the CDA and recommendations for an individualized treatment plan moving forward.

Individualized Intensive Treatment

Beyond the assessment phase, this program focuses on developing a moderated, controlled use of the positive technology of the internet.

The program includes:

  • Individual psychotherapy with an Internet Addiction Specialist (2 times per week)
    • Identifying specific triggers and behaviors associated
    • Incorporating treatment elements of all mental health concerns identified
    • Patient identification of elements of the CUBIS Model (developed at Lindner Center of HOPE to show the relationship between substance use and mental illness)
    • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) to assist in developing and establishing a behavioral plan
    • Understanding the addictive process
    • Understanding the role of escape
  • Parent/Guardian coaching on internet addiction regulation and monitoring (2 times per week)
    • Assistance in developing a behavioral plan for the home
    • Assistance in developing skills to manage their adolescent’s internet use
    • Use Addiction Parent Workbook to promote a digital diet and digital nutrition
  • Specialized psychoeducational programming for healthy internet behavior (3 times per week)
    • Programming focused on healthy device usage includes
    • Recognizing Online Me versus Offline Me
    • Understanding Digital Diet and Digital Nutrition
    • Identifying and building upon strengths
    • Developing health coping skills
    • Creating a healthy daily routine
    • Limiting access
    • Managing negative thoughts
    • Recognizing health social interludes
    • Setting goals for the future
  • Exposure experiences, as indicated, with behavioral specialist for internet addiction behaviors (2 times per week). Specialized work with impulse-control therapist.
    • Exposure activities to assist the patient in developing healthy management and regulation skills while utilizing devices.

Behavioral Addiction Screening Questions

Addictions do not improve when ignored. In fact, behaviors related to addictions most often worsen. Acknowledging the problem is the first step towards overcoming the problem, recovering and returning to a rewarding life. But how does someone know if he or she has an addiction?

The following brief self-tests developed by addiction specialists can help individuals determine if they need an evaluation. However, only a licensed professional in a one-on-one setting can positively and properly diagnose an addiction or other mental health disorder.

Complete a screening and contact Lindner Center of HOPE to learn more.

Problematic Internet Use Screening


The Internet has impacted the world and provided many benefits to its users. At the same time the Internet has had negative ramifications. Some people are preoccupied with using the Internet and are unable to control their use, jeopardizing their employment and relationships. Symptoms are comparable to criteria used to diagnose other addictions. Research characterizes Internet addiction as an impulse control disorder.


Please answer yes or no to each of the following:

  • Do you find that you stay online longer than you intended?
  • Does your work (or school work) suffer because of the amount of time you spend online?
  • Do you neglect household chores to spend more time online?
  • Do you form new relationships with others online?
  • Do you lose sleep due to being online late at night?
  • Have you tried to cut down on the amount of time you spend online and failed?
  • Do you feel depressed, moody, or nervous when you are off-line, which goes away once you are back online?
  • Do others in your life complain to you about the amount of time you spend online?
  • Have you ever noticed that your job performance or productivity suffers because of the time spent online?

These questions are intended to help a person recognize if he or she may have a concern with an area of addiction. Answering yes to two or more of the questions may indicate a lifestyle in which a particular behavior has become problematic.

Take the Next Step

If you think you have an addiction, consider a professional evaluation to determine the best course of treatment.

Problematic Gaming Screening


An addiction to video games or computer games is treated in much the same way as any other addiction. Like other people with addictions, “gamers” often are trying to escape problems in their lives. Video and computer games offer a particularly appealing escape to socially maladjusted teenagers, most often boys, who find it intoxicating to become immersed in a world completely under their control.


Please answer yes or no to each of the following:

  • Do you, or your child, feel really happy when you’re online or when you’re playing games, but as soon as you have to stop, you get angry or upset?
  • Do you, or your child, think about going online or playing when you are supposed to be focusing on other things, like doing school work or having dinner with your family?
  • Do you, or your child, spend more time with your keyboard or controller than physically hanging out with your friends?
  • Do you, your friends, or parents ask what you spend all your time doing, and you lie about it or laugh it off, but inside you know they may have a point?
  • Do you get up in the middle of the night to check your e-mail or your social network comments because you’re having a hard time sleeping?
  • Do you, or your child, play for increasing amounts of time?
  • Do you, or you child, spend a great deal of time thinking about gaming while involved in other activities?
  • Do you, or your child, utilize gaming as a way to escape from real-life problems, anxiety, or depression?
  • Do you, or your child, lie to friends and family members to conceal the gaming behavior?

These questions are intended to help a person recognize if he or she may have a concern with an area of addiction. Answering yes to two or more of the questions may indicate a lifestyle in which a particular behavior has become problematic.

Take the Next Step

If you think you have an addiction, consider a professional evaluation to determine the best course of treatment.

Williams House Amenities

Patients at Williams House will benefit from a newly renovated space with private rooms and a full bath. Other amenities include separate dining room, gymnasium, outdoor spaces and a faith center.


There is HOPE. For help, call

1-888-537-4229

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