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Addictions are Often the Next Step beyond Substance Abuse

Substance abuse is certainly not restricted to the young. Anyone at any age can develop a repetitive pattern of drug and alcohol use that can damage their physical and mental health, threaten their relationships and diminish their performance at school or on the job.

From Use to Abuse to Addiction

Why are some people able to eventually move away from use and abuse while others become captives of addiction? The answer to this question is not always easy to pin down. But there are a number of factors that may play into the development of an addiction.

Genetic, psychological and environmental influences are key contributors toward addictive behaviors. Numerous studies have revealed that a biological predisposition exists in a large percentage of those addicted to drugs or alcohol. Other types of individuals prone to self-medicate include those that suffer with a mental illness; were raised in extremely dysfunctional homes; or have been subjected to some form of abuse.

What usually begins as occasional drug or alcohol use to soothe wounds or provide temporary pleasure will often evolve into regular use or abuse. The next stage is dependence or the inability to stop consumption of drugs or alcohol without showing symptoms of withdrawal. These are sure signs of full-blown addictive disorders.

Addiction Treatment

Addiction centers can be found in most metropolitan in the U.S. One example is Lindner Center of HOPE’s Sibcy House. Located just north of Cincinnati, Ohio, Sibcy House offers cutting-edge addictive disorders treatment and a patient analysis that begins with a thorough diagnosis.

Addiction recovery can be lengthy and at times difficult. But with the establishment of proper care and a willingness from the patient to get to a healthier place in their lives, a successful recovery is well within reach.

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This blog is written and published by Lindner Center of HOPE.

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Loosening the Destructive Grip of Addictive Disorders

Addictions come in many forms. But those suffering with develop an uncontrollable urge to revisit a substance, activity or behavior in order to satisfy a need or desire. An addiction may fill a void in one’s life, or act as a salve for a festering emotional wound.

Those at the mercy of their addictive behaviors often experience gradually increasing levels of emotional pain and deteriorating mental or physical health. Another byproduct of serious addiction is the tendency to eschew responsibilities and neglect important aspects within one’s life, such as friends, family, school and career. Many suffering with addictions are also prone to struggles with depression.

Treating Addictive Disorders

Addictive personality disorder is a condition where an individual carries traits making them more susceptible to addictive behaviors. However, anyone at any stage or walk of life can develop an addiction.

People can become addicted to eating, gambling, smoking, exercise and countless other activities that offer comfort or what they determine to be an “escape.” But the most pervasive and widely-publicized addiction in our society involves alcohol and drugs.

Alcoholism and drug addiction are serious health problems in the U.S. and around the world. Those who become dependent on alcohol and drugs subject themselves to a life full of difficulties ranging from relationship and legal problems to homelessness and destitution.

Addiction recovery is often a long-term and sometimes arduous process. But with proper medical care and support from friends and family, addiction treatment can be successful.

Inpatient addiction centers such as Cincinnati, Ohio’s Lindner Center of Hope and Sibcy House are examples of facilities providing environments conducive to success in treating addictive disorders. Using a team of experienced mental health specialists and an intensive, cutting-edge treatment plan focusing on detoxification and stabilization, Lindner Center of Hope sets the standard for addiction treatment. Its reputation for helping those with addictive disorders go on to live fulfilling, productive lives continues to grow.

 

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Eating Disorder Treatment Involves Changing Behavior Patterns

Although there are differences between the eating disorders anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, they do share some of the same characteristics. Among other similarities, individuals who suffer with these disorders generally have an unfavorable view of their own bodies.

The fear of becoming overweight or the perception that one is overweight — even if they are not — are major psychological factors behind the development of these and other eating disorders. Individuals with these disorders are driven to engage in one or more of the following practices: self-induced vomiting after eating, purging, excessive exercise, disproportionate use of laxatives and periods of not eating.

It has been well documented that the major demographic of those with eating disorders are teenage girls. However, it is now common knowledge that these disorders do not discriminate. Adult men and women as well as males in their late teens also struggle with eating disorders.

Eating Disorder Treatment: Emphasis on Behavioral Adjustments

In addition to the deep-seeded psychological aspects of eating disorders that can lead to depression and other mood disorders, the physical ramifications can be devastating and even deadly. The bones and teeth may suffer due to the body not absorbing or maintaining a healthy amount of nutrients. A host of other issues such as a loss of muscle, anemia and organ damage may result from the unhealthy habits that those with eating disorders have developed.

Anorexia treatment, bulimia treatment and the treatment of eating disorders often requires a multifaceted approach. Not only must a patient be nurtured back to physical health, but the psychological aspect of these disorders must be addressed through intensive psychotherapy.

One of the most effective modes of psychotherapeutic treatment for eating disorders has proven to be cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).  In those with eating disorders, CBT focuses on areas such as improving self-esteem and developing a more realistic body image. This therapy works to redirect the “rules” these individuals have established in regard to eating habits.

Some of the nation’s leading eating disorder treatment centers such as Lindner Center of Hope’s Sibcy House near Cincinnati, Ohio incorporate CBT into their treatment plan. It is part of a well-rounded program that has helped many eating disorders patients change destructive habits and develop a healthier outlook on life.

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Mental Health Treatment Centers Offer a Wide Variety of Services

Over 45 million Americans have some form of mental illness. Roughly 25 percent of these individuals have disorders considered to be serious, according to a recent Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) study. With the number of Americans suffering from mental illness and substance abuse problems on the rise, caregivers and treatment facilities throughout the country continue to work to meet increasing demands.

One way this troubling trend is being addressed is through the creation of comprehensive mental health treatment centers. In recent years more focus has been placed upon the consolidation of mental health services that were once spread throughout a city or region.

Mental Health Centers are All-Encompassing

Many of the newer mental health centers are universal in their offerings. They provide inpatient and outpatient services for a wide range of mental health issues and are staffed with a diverse array of experienced therapists and psychiatric specialists.

These types of facilities will often contain separate areas for children, adolescents and adults. ADHD treatment, adolescent depression treatment, eating disorder treatment and treatment for anxiety and bipolar disorders are among the services that can be performed under one roof.

Some mental health centers also contain short-term residential units, such as Lindner Center of Hope’s “Sibcy House” near Cincinnati, Ohio. Sibcy House staff members specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of those with complex mental disorders, addictive disorders and those who have experienced a mental health crisis.

The Lindner facility is also one of the few mental health centers in the country to offer both ECT and TMS treatment. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are used in severe depression treatment and to address conditions for other types of treatment that have failed. These devices are located in Lindner’s new state-of-the-art Neuromodulation Center.

The centralization of services in modern-day mental health centers has been a positive development in a number of ways, including making treatment more accessible to patients and communication between caregivers more convenient. This is especially the case in situations where multiple modes of treatment may be necessary.