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Dr. John Hawkins Named Principal Investigator for Clinical Trial of Non-drug Depression Treatment

Technology capable of reaching deeper brain areas may provide relief of symptoms for patients resistant to medication

Cincinnati, Ohio – For more than four million Americans in the United States, the symptoms of depression are not relieved by the use of antidepressant medications. This class of depression falls into one of two categories, treatment resistant depression (TRD)or treatment intolerant depression (TID). The TRD group often tries and fails several different types of medications – either alone or in combination – while the TID group has medication side effects so debilitating that they cannot tolerate the treatment.

For these patients, an entirely new type of treatment is being studied at the Lindner Center of HOPE, led by John Hawkins, M.D., chief of psychiatry at the center. The technology, called multicoil repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or simply TMS, is a non-medication, non-systemic and non-invasive approach to treating depression.

“TMS offers patients that either do not respond to, or cannot tolerate medication, a new treatment option,” said Dr. Hawkins. “Our clinic is currently studying a new approach to this technology and we are hopeful that it will provide relief for these patients that have been suffering from depression in some cases for several years.”

Depression is thought to occur because of less than optimalchemical activity in the brain. TheTMS treatment currently under study by Dr. Hawkins and his team uses multiple magnetic fields, generated by coils placed on a patient’s scalp, to stimulate specific brain regions both on the surface and in deeper regions of the brain. This research is important in understanding whether TMS treatment restores normal brain chemical activity, thereby reducing the symptoms of depression. To date, more than 100 patients have been studied using this approach without the occurrence of serious side effects related to the device.

Depression is a mental disorder characterized by loss of interest or pleasure in activities that were previously enjoyable, a decrease in energy, feelings of low self-worth, disturbed sleep or appetite and difficultyin concentrating.1 Depression often comes with symptoms of anxiety and these problems can become chronic, substantially impairing the ability of an individual to take care of everyday responsibilities.  On a global scale, depression affects more than 350 million people and is the leading cause of disability worldwide.2

To find out more information about the TMS study at Lindner Center of HOPE contact 513-536-0712 or visit http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01909232.

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1Marcus, M. et al. Depression: A Global Public Health Concern. World Health Organization 2012, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse. http://www.who.int/mental_health/management/depression/who_paper_depression_wfmh_2012.pdf.Accessed 04.6.2013.

2Marcus, M. et al.

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Dr. Kendell joins Lindner Center of HOPE

Mason, OH – Steven F. Kendell, MD, has joined Lindner Center of HOPE as a staff psychiatrist.

Dr. Kendell is board certified in general psychiatry.  As a staff psychiatrist atDr. Steven J. Kendell Lindner Center of HOPE his principal work is in adult partial hospitalization, adult inpatient care and outpatient services.

Prior to joining the Lindner Center of HOPE, Dr. Kendell served as Director of Research at Blue Horizon International Stem Cell Investigation and Treatment Program in New York, New York. Dr. Kendell’s other clinical positions have included serving as Attending Psychiatrist at Appalachian Behavioral Healthcare, Athens, Ohio; Attending Psychiatrist at Kettering Behavioral Medicine Center in Kettering, Ohio and Attending Psychiatrist at Butte County Department of Behavioral Health in Chico, California.

Dr. Kendell’s academic appointments have included Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Athens, Ohio; Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Boonshoft School of Medicine in Dayton, Ohio, and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

Dr. Kendell has received a number of awards and honors and has been a member of several professional societies. He also has supervised medical students and has co-authored several original reports, book chapters and scientific abstracts.

Lindner Center of HOPE  provides patient-centered, scientifically-advanced care for individuals suffering with mental illness. A state-of-the-science, free-standing mental health center and charter member of the National Network of Depression Centers, the Center provides psychiatric hospitalization for individuals age 12-years-old and older, outpatient services for all ages, research and voluntary, live-in services. The Center’s clinicians are ranked among the best providers locally, nationally and internationally. Lindner Center of HOPE is affiliated with the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine.

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Binge Eating

Armodafinil - Donuts2

 

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This blog is written and published by Lindner Center of HOPE.

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Ways to Combat Anxiety

Anxiety affects many people, and sometimes it may seem impossible to stop worrying about things you cannot control. These questions and fears can be paralyzing and sometimes might affect your daily life. However, there is a way to push these fears aside and get on with your normal routine.

Start by letting yourself worry, but only for a certain amount of time. Set a time each day to go over these worries, for example 20 minutes each day at noon. It should be a time of day far from bedtime, but during this period you’re allowed to worry about whatever is on your mind.

Outside of this time however, no worrying allowed. If a worry comes up during the day, write it down and save it for your worry period.

During your worry period, ask yourself if this problem can actually be solved. If so, start thinking of ways you can solve the problem and find a solution. If it’s not a problem that can be solved, you must find a way to accept that, so you don’t continue to worry about it.

Another good way to combat anxiety is to be aware of how others make you feel. The way other people act around us can be contagious, so pay attention to they way other people affect you. Keeping a journal is a good way to take note of this behavior so you can avoid these people in the future.

When you start to notice certain people making you feel anxious, make an effort not to be around those people. Perhaps a certain conversational topic makes you feel anxious, so make note of it, and avoid that topic from now on.

By following these simple tips, you will be able to control and combat your anxious feelings from now on.

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This blog is written and published by Lindner Center of HOPE.

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Binge Eating Research Study

Armodafinil

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This blog is written and published by Lindner Center of HOPE.

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Depression. It hits when least expected.

Are you struggling from Depression?

Are you experiencing sadness, lost of interest, feelings of emptiness or trouble sleeping?

If so, and you are between the ages of 18-65, you may be interested in participating in a clinical research study of an investigational medication or placebo for adults suffering from depression. An investigational medication is one which has not been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A placebo contains no active medication. Participants will receive study-related evaluations, visits and tests without charge.

For more information please contact Jessica at 513-536-0704 or visit www.lcoh.info

All inquiries are kept confidential.

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This blog is written and published by Lindner Center of HOPE.

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Stress Relief

Everyone seems to have busy schedules these days and stress is something nearly everyone suffers from as a result of it. Luckily, there are several things we can do to relieve stress in our everyday lives.

Massage. Getting a massage is a great way to relieve stress. It’s a way to relax your muscles, reduce pain, and improve circulation, which puts you in a mental and physical state for relaxation.

Meditation. From 15-30 minutes each day, meditation can serve as a great stress reliever. To meditate, give yourself some quiet time to let your thoughts run wild or to simply focus on your breathing. This small section of peace in your day can help you deal with stress, and perhaps relieve some.

Exercise. No matter what the physical activity is, this allows you time alone with your thoughts, while at the same time, releases endorphins to the brain, which make you feel better. Physical exercise also prevents obesity and additional health problems, which gives you less to be stressed about.

Organization. When you’re organized, you have greater peace of mind. The mind can rest when you know everything is in its proper place, and when things are clean. Even the sight of clutter has been said to cause stress, so tidy up!

Eating healthy. Foods that are high in fat or sugar have proven to be a source of depression. Some foods, including blueberries, salmon, and almonds, are said so be especially effective in reducing stress. It’s also a good idea to avoid caffeine after lunch so you can get a good night’s rest.

Disconnect. Letting go of your cell phone or lowering your internet use can lower stress by blocking some of the sources of stress. So turn off your electronics and live in the moment for a little while.

By following these easy ways to relieve stress, you’ll find yourself less tense and better able to tackle daily challenges.

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This blog is written and published by Lindner Center of HOPE.

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Touchdown for HOPE Scheduled for Sunday, Feb. 3, 2013

What a Way to Watch the Super Bowl!

Super Bowl XLVII Event Raises Money for Harold C. Schott Eating Disorders Program at Lindner Center of HOPE

Mason, OH –The fourth annual Touchdown for HOPE Super Bowl Sunday event will take place on February 3, 2013 at the Great American Ballpark Champions Club. Touchdown for HOPE is a classy, upscale Super Bowl party with big screen televisions, plush seating, signature Cincinnati food favorites, with a built-in tailgating party with live music, all in a sports fan’s dream location, with proceeds going to enhance mental health care in the community.

Originally conceived in 2010 by Scott Robertson, Carl Satterwaite and John Ryan, this annual event, with hosts Anthony and Dede Munoz, has consistently raised over $200,000 and continues to improve the lives of those suffering with mental illness.

“The study and treatment of eating disorders are extremely complex,” said Dr. Paul E. Keck, Jr., President & CEO of Lindner Center of HOPE. “It’s a devastating illness and in spite of the unprecedented growth of eating disorders in the past two decades, research continues to be under-funded, insurance coverage for treatment is inadequate, societal pressures to be thin remain rampant and obesity is an epidemic.”

Event details:

Location: Great American Ballpark, Champions Club.

Date: February 3, 2013; 5:00pm

Tickets: $100

Reservations: http://www.lindnercenterofhope.org/touchdown.aspx or 513-536-0304.

Lindner Center of HOPE  provides patient-centered, scientifically-advanced care for individuals suffering with mental illness. A state-of-the-science, free-standing mental health center and charter member of the National Network of Depression Centers, the Center provides psychiatric hospitalization for individuals age 12-years-old and older, outpatient services for all ages, research and voluntary, live-in services. The Center’s clinicians are ranked among the best providers locally, nationally and internationally. Lindner Center of HOPE is affiliated with the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine.

 

CONTACT:

Jennifer Pierson

Lindner Center of HOPE

(513) 536-0316

jennifer.pierson@lindnercenter.org

                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

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Mental Illness Awareness Week 2012: October 7-13, 2012

NEWS ALERT FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Mason, OH – October 4,2012 – In 1990, the U.S. Congress established the first full week of October as Mental Illness Awareness Week (MIAW) in recognition of NAMI’s efforts to raise mental illness awareness. Since 1990, mental health advocates across the country have joined together during the first full week of October to promote education and understanding.

MIAW has become a NAMI tradition. It presents an opportunity to all NAMI state organizations and affiliates across the country to work together in communities to achieve the NAMI mission through outreach, education and advocacy. This year’s theme is Changing Attitudes, Changing Lives.

The National Day of Prayer for Mental Illness Recovery and Understanding is Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012.

Locally, Lindner Center of HOPE is a resource for individuals and families faced with mental illness. Since Lindner Center of HOPE, 4075 Old Western Row Road, Mason, Ohio, opened in 2008 it has made a positive impact on mental health care in Greater Cincinnati. Nearly 4,000 people have been taken care of in the hospital, approximately 6,500 people have made more than 100,000 outpatient visits, approximately 400 people have been patients in Sibcy House (residential care), approximately 400 people have received neuromodulation services and the research institute has received more than 24 grants totaling nearly $2 million and published in over 30 peer-reviewed journals.

About Lindner Center of HOPE:  A state-of-the-science, free-standing mental health center and charter member of the National Network of Depression Centers, the Center provides psychiatric hospitalization for individuals age 12-years-old and older, outpatient services for all ages, research, comprehensive assessment and residential services. The Center’s clinicians are ranked among the best providers locally, nationally and internationally.

 


CONTACT :

Jennifer Pierson

Lindner Center of HOPE

(513) 536-0316

jennifer.pierson@lindnercenter.org

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TMS Treatment May Benefit Those with Severe Depression

During the course of our lives, we are affected by various occurrences and circumstances which cause us to become angry, fearful, bewildered, joyful and sad. It is normal and expected that we will experience each of these emotions from time to time. It is not unusual for us to go through an entire range of emotions within the same day.

But when any of these emotions linger for an inordinate amount of time or appear to have become inescapable, there is a good chance that a potentially serious mental health issue exists.

Depression is the most common mental illness, affecting millions of people around the world. It is a condition that carries symptoms such as prolonged sadness, an inability to concentrate and feelings of hopelessness, worthlessness and despair that are at times intense.

Fortunately, approaches to depression treatment have become more refined over the years, helping many get back on their feet and live productive, fulfilling lives. But conventional treatment such as medications and talk therapy do not necessarily work for everyone, especially those suffering with severe depression.

TMS: An Effective Alternative

Recently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a treatment technique called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). This relatively new form of treatment is non-invasive and requires no medication. The patient sits comfortably in a specially-made chair while a device is placed over their head. This device creates a magnetic field which is targeted toward the prefrontal cortex; the mood-regulating area of the brain. TMS treatment stimulates activity in this area and decreases activity in surrounding regions of the brain.

After having undergone a series of TMS therapy treatments, many patients have shown marked improvement and a significant diminishment of their depression symptoms. The long-term effectiveness of TMS is not yet known. However in the short run, it has proven to be successful where other treatment methods have failed.

Call 513-536-HOPE (4673) or 888-536-HOPE (4673)

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This blog is written and published by Lindner Center of HOPE.