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Obesity and binge eating: a disrupted clock in our body?

A UC, Lindner Center of HOPE study investigates the role of the circadian clock in obesity and eating behavior

The clocks on our walls, on the lock screens of our phones and attached to our wrists drive most actions in our lives. Time determines when we have to go to bed or wake up in the morning, when we need to be in class or at work and even when we feel the need to eat breakfast, lunch or dinner.

We also have inner, cellular clocks in most tissues of our body that are coordinated by a master circadian clock in the brain. These clocks form our circadian system that triggers some of these needs and responses, like getting tired and feeling hunger.

Now, researchers at the University of Cincinnati and the Lindner Center of HOPE are hosting a unique clinical trial to see if readjusting the circadian system of people with binge eating behavior can help in understanding more about why this occurs and develop new treatment options in the future. Scientists are using tabletop lamps and melatonin supplements to test their theory.

Binge eating behavior is a form of disordered eating characterized by excessive food consumption with a loss of control, causing a person to overeat in a relatively short period of time.

The associated Binge Eating Disorder, or BED, is characterized by recurrent episodes, without the compensatory behaviors observed in bulimia nervosa, meaning purging afterward. BED is the most prevalent eating disorder worldwide and affects an estimated 2.8 million people in the United States. It is frequently observed in individuals with obesity and those with other psychiatric diagnoses, like mood and anxiety disorders. Many are unaware that they have BED, and it remains undiagnosed. Additionally, treatment options are very limited.

Francisco Romo-Nava, MD, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences at UC, associate chief research officer for the Research Institute at the Lindner Center of HOPE and a UC Health physician scientist, says little is known about how the circadian system in these patients impacts their eating patterns.

Francisco Romo-Nava Psychiatry

“The circadian system makes it possible for our body to adapt to day and night periods, which has profound effects on physiology and behavior beyond regulation of sleep and wake cycles,” he says. “The most powerful signals that synchronize our circadian system are the presence of daylight and the production of melatonin at night, which is the chemical signal of darkness.

“The circadian system is different for each person. For example, some people work better during the day while others do so at night. Some people skip breakfast, while others eat a large meal to start the day. Recent studies suggest that the circadian system may be involved in regulating our food choices, the time at which we eat and how much we eat. However, the involvement of the circadian system in disordered eating behavior, such as binge eating behavior, is not well understood.”

Romo-Nava says preliminary research has shown that those with binge eating disorder may have circadian system abnormalities, and that by targeting this system in the body, new interventions and treatments may be available for patients.

In this study, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health and housed at UC’s Lindner Center of HOPE, researchers will compare the circadian system function in 80 adults with obesity, 40 with binge eating disorder and 40 without, for two weeks. Participants will complete a sleep and eating behavior diary and wear a device — a watch — that measures activity patterns.

Their circadian phases will be assessed by determining surges in melatonin concentrations at the specific point in time when their brains and bodies shift into “night mode.”

Romo-Nava says, traditionally, studies such as this involved costly and inconvenient in-hospital or sleep lab assessments of melatonin concentrations in saliva samples under dim lights, mimicking dusk, to detect the time of the surge in melatonin production at night.

However, in this study, researchers are using a new approach, where participants can collect the saliva samples easily at home in a dimly lit room.   

Finally, researchers will test whether or not they can resynchronize study participants’ circadian system over the course of a month by combining morning light, mimicked by tabletop lamps, and the administration of a fixed dose of melatonin or placebo at night. The melatonin is given at times that are individualized according to each participants’ circadian phase. This phase of the study will only be conducted on individuals who have been diagnosed with binge eating disorder.

“We want to evaluate if this method can be an individualized way to study the circadian system in this condition,” Romo-Nava says. “But ultimately, we want to advance our understanding of the role of the circadian system in binge eating disorder, and this study will provide valuable insight on its potential as a new therapeutic target. We’re excited about how this could positively impact patients with binge eating disorder in the future.”

More about the study

Participants without binge eating will be paid up to $215 for completing four study visits that involve assessments and laboratory studies. Participants with BED will be paid up to $440 for completing study procedures, which also include an intervention study phase and a total of eight study visits. Payments will be made at the end of each study visit with a prepaid debit card. For more information, contact Brian or George at (513) 536-0707 or fill out a prescreening questionnaire.

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Lindner Center of HOPE Founding Member and Provider of Hall of Fame Behavioral Health

May 6, 2021, Mason, OH – Lindner Center of HOPE is proud to announce that it is a founding member and official provider of Hall of Fame Behavioral Health. The Pro Football Hall of Fame today announced the formation of Hall of Fame Behavioral Health, a program created to find comprehensive solutions through a network of mental and behavioral health services designed specifically for current and former athletes and their families.

With the support of numerous ambassadors – among them Pro Football Hall of Fame President & CEO David Baker; Hall of Famers RONNIE LOTT, BRIAN DAWKINS, STEVE ATWATER, ANDRE REED and TIM BROWN; current players Adrian Peterson and Calais Campbell; and other former NFL players and health care advocates – Hall of Fame Behavioral Health was founded with a simple yet challenging mission: to make mental health and the treatment of issues surrounding athletes and those who care for them destigmatized, accessible and widespread.

“We have to end the stigma surrounding mental health, and that includes athletes,” Dawkins said. “It’s OK to ask for help and to reach out if you are having issues. It’s OK not to be OK. But it’s not OK to stay that way – because our silence is killing us and damaging our families.”

Hall of Fame Behavioral Health will offer an easy-to-use concierge call center and crisis line to match treatment and counseling services with a vetted and accredited premier network of service providers across the country. These providers are trained to deal with such issues as post-career transition, identity, addiction, performance anxiety, mindfulness and the culture of sports. They understand athletes and can customize care to meet their needs. Services will complement existing programs and assistance available to players through the National Football League and its affiliated partners.

“The Pro Football Hall of Fame has always been about protecting the most important part of the game of football: the players,” Baker said. “With Hall of Fame Behavioral Health, our mission is to make mental and behavioral health services that meet the Hall of Fame’s standards of excellence easily accessible and available not only to Hall of Famers but to every player of this game, the people who support them and the kids dreaming about one day playing in the League. The Pro Football Hall of Fame is committed to ending the stigma that surrounds asking for help and protecting our family of athletes for generations to come.”

Wes Cain, President and CEO of Hall of Fame Behavioral Health, understands the importance of reaching those who feel reluctant to take the first steps in getting help. “Whether it’s affordability, access or simply saying the words ‘I need help’ to a trusted friend, current and retired athletes have faced an uphill battle in seeking and receiving mental health services. Our goal is to let everyone know that if you are a first-ballot Hall of Famer or a practice squad player, we hear you and we are here to support you. No one should be left behind on their journey to live a healthy life.”

Hall of Fame Behavioral Health is the newest health care-related initiative affiliated with the Pro Football Hall of Fame. In early 2020, the Hall announced its official entry into health services with the creation of Hall of Fame Health. Over the past year, Hall of Fame Health has developed several ways for former players and their families to obtain a full range of medical care. Offerings include: a provider network with concierge access at more than a dozen (and growing) top health systems in the country; a medical advisory board comprised of world-class physicians and clinicians; and a partner benefits administrator to assist with gaining access to top insurance offerings.

“Hall of Fame Behavioral Health is the latest development in this growing initiative, and it might be the one addressing the greatest need,” said Jeremy Hogue, CEO of Hall of Fame Health.

Hall of Fame Behavioral Health has partnered with these Centers of Excellence across the country:

  • Ashley Addiction Treatment (Baltimore, Md.)
  • Aultman Health Foundation (Canton, Ohio)
  • Baylor Scott & White Health (Dallas)
  • Emory Healthcare (Atlanta)
  • Lindner Center of HOPE (Cincinnati, Ohio)
  • Nashville Recovery Center (Nashville)
  • New Method Wellness (Southern California)
  • Sabino Recovery (Tucson, Ariz.)
  • The Becoming Counseling & Wellness (National)
  • The Menninger Clinic (Houston)
  • UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences (San Francisco)
  • Vanderbilt Health (Nashville)

Additional Centers of Excellence, player ambassadors and strategic partners are expected to join the Hall of Fame Behavioral Health network in coming months.

For those needing financial assistance, Hall of Fame Behavioral Health has partnered with the HART Foundation to provide grants and funding to ensure those who need help can receive it – no matter their economic situation.

“We are a forever brotherhood,” Dawkins said of athletes, “and we must do a better job of looking out for one another. There are many options out there, and now you can add Hall of Fame Behavioral Health as a viable and reliable one.”

Anyone experiencing a mental health emergency or requiring emergency assistance should call the HOFBH Crisis Line at 866-901-1245, or call 911, or head to the nearest hospital emergency room.

CONTACTS:
Rich Desrosiers, Vice President of Communications and Public Relations
Rich.Desrosiers@ProFootballHOF.com; 330-588-3622

Rachel Gutting, Director of Communications & Strategic Initiatives
Rachel.Gutting@ProFootballHOF.com; 330-588-3671

ABOUT THE PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME
Located in Canton, Ohio, the birthplace of the National Football League, the Pro Football Hall of Fame is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit institution with the Mission to Honor the Heroes of the Game, Preserve its History, Promote its Values, & Celebrate Excellence EVERYWHERE.

The Pro Football Hall of Fame is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. AAM accreditation is national recognition for the museum’s commitment to excellence and the highest professional standards of museum operation and public service.

Hundreds of thousands of fans from across the globe travel to Canton annually to experience
“The Most Inspiring Place on Earth!” that chronicles America’s most popular sport. Fans can also enjoy the Hall of Fame Store at the Hall, and online at www.profootballhof.com/store, for merchandise from all 32 NFL clubs plus the Hall of Fame. Proceeds from the Store support the Hall’s Mission.

Construction on Hall of Fame Village Powered by Johnson Controls, a mixed-use development project, is under way in Canton to transform the Hall of Fame’s campus.

CONTACT:
Lauren Renschler, William Raymond Communications
lauren@william-raymond.com; 310-463-0863

ABOUT HALL OF FAME BEHAVIORAL HEALTH:
Hall of Fame Behavioral Health is an affiliate of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Its mission is to provide a comprehensive solution for mental health, behavioral health and substance use issues for all athletes and their families. By partnering with Centers of Excellence across the United States, HOFBH can ensure consistent, high-quality care customized for athletes and those who support them. For more information visit, www.hofbh.com, email Team@hofbh.com or call 866-901-1241 to speak to the HOFBH Concierge Call Center.
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SOURCE Hall of Fame Behavioral Health

Related Links

http://www.hofbh.com

Lindner Center of HOPE in Mason is a comprehensive mental health center providing excellent, patient-centered, scientifically-advanced care for individuals suffering with mental illness. A state-of-the-science, mental health center and charter member of the National Network of Depression Centers, the Center provides psychiatric hospitalization and partial hospitalization for individuals age 12-years-old and older, outpatient services for all ages, diagnostic services for all ages and short-term residential services for adults, and research. The Center is enhanced by its partnership with UC Health as its clinicians are ranked among the best providers locally, nationally and internationally. Together Lindner Center of HOPE and UC Health offer a true system of mental health care in the Greater Cincinnati area and across the country. The Center is also affiliated with the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine.

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Researcher at The Research Institute at Lindner Center of HOPE Awarded Prestigious Career Development Award

National Institute of Mental Health Acknowledges Dr. Romo-Nava with Highly Coveted Award

Dr. Francisco Romo-Nava, MD, PhD

Mason, OH –The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) awarded a K23 Career Development Award titled “The role of the circadian system in binge eating disorder” to Dr. Francisco Romo-Nava, MD, PhD, Associate Chief Research Officer at The Research Institute at Lindner Center of HOPE. This is a highly competitive award for clinician-scientists that will enable the development of the “Neuroscience of the Body Research Program” to study the role of brain-body communication in psychiatric disorders.

This K-23 award involves a study with a novel approach to investigate the circadian system function and its’ potential as a therapeutic target in binge eating disorder. During this award, Dr. Romo-Nava will receive mentoring by world renowned researchers. Dr. Susan L. McElroy, Chief Research Officer at The Research Institute at Lindner Center of HOPE, will mentor Dr. Romo-Nava during the award period. Dr. Romo-Nava will also receive mentoring by Dr. Carlos Grilo at Yale University, Dr. Frank Scheer at Harvard University, Dr. Robert McNamara and Dr. Jeffrey Welge at the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Romo-Nava will also collaborate with Dr. Helen Burgess at the University of Michigan.

This award involves an estimated budget of $810,000 during the next four years.

Lindner Center of HOPE in Mason is a comprehensive mental health center providing excellent, patient-centered, scientifically-advanced care for individuals suffering with mental illness. A state-of-the-science, mental health center and charter member of the National Network of Depression Centers, the Center provides psychiatric hospitalization and partial hospitalization for individuals age 12-years-old and older, outpatient services for all ages, diagnostic services for all ages and short-term residential services for adults, outpatient services for substance abuse through HOPE Center North location and co-occurring disorders for adults and research. The Center is enhanced by its partnership with UC Health as its clinicians are ranked among the best providers locally, nationally and internationally. Together Lindner Center of HOPE and UC Health offer a true system of mental health care in the Greater Cincinnati area and across the country. The Center is also affiliated with the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine.

 

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Lindner Center of HOPE’s Comprehensive Diagnostic Assessment for Children and Adolescents Now Available Virtually

 

Lindner Center of HOPE’s Comprehensive Diagnostic Assessment for Children and Adolescents Now Available Virtually

Now, perhaps more than ever, families may be concerned about the mental wellbeing of their child or adolescent. In many cases, observing children in their home environments having to manage school stress, face isolation from friends and extended family, being restricted from doing their normal activities; parents/guardians may be increasingly concerned about behaviors, mental health and functioning.

Lindner Center of HOPE offers an affordable and accessible 3.5 day intensive outpatient diagnostic program for young people age 6 to 17 (18 if still in high school), to help families reach a clear and accurate diagnosis that will provide direction for treatment. Due to ongoing COVID-19 safety recommendations, this program is available as a virtual offering for families located or staying in Ohio. (Program providers are licensed in Ohio and can serve families living or staying in Ohio during the assessment. Families residing outside of Ohio can come to the state and still participate in the virtual program.)

The virtual program incorporates everything from the previously operating, face to face program, including a full battery of neurocognitive and psychological testing, psychiatric assessment, family assessment, as well as specialty consults (ie obsessive compulsive disorder, anxiety, eating disorder, addiction, trauma or behavioral addictions). The assessment also includes genetic testing to assist in medication recommendations and lab work, completed prior to starting assessment. The entire assessment is done through video and online applications.

What’s included in the assessment?
• Comprehensive psychiatric assessment performed by skilled multidisciplinary team
• Pre-admission screening and evaluation of records
• Care coordination, psychosocial assessment and collateral interviews
• Psychiatric consultation
• Psychological evaluation and testing
• Specialty diagnostic and therapeutic consultations, as clinically indicated
• Strengths-based family assessment
• Genetic testing with results review
• Feedback session with diagnostic team
• Written report of results and recommendations
• Aftercare planning
• Follow up call with clinical social worker 6 weeks after feedback session

SCHEDULING
Our admissions team will work with the family and any existing referral sources to understand the issues and expectations to determine if the outpatient comprehensive diagnostic assessment will meet the needs.

Assessments typically begin on Mondays or Tuesdays and continue during business hours through the work week. Assessments must be planned and scheduled through admissions and the clinical social worker. Existing records should be provided in advance of arrival to prepare the team with history, goals and personalization of the assessment.

Call Admissions today to discuss scheduling an outpatient comprehensive diagnostic assessment for your child or adolescent. 513-536-0537.

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Lindner Center of HOPE Expands Fund for Financial Assistance for Mental Health Services for First Responders to Include Health Care Workers Amidst Stress of Pandemic

Novel Coronavirus Is Increasing Need for Mental Health Care and Substance Use Treatment

Mason, OH –Lindner Center of HOPE is expanding its mental health services patient assistance fund established in February 2020 to help first responders with costs associated with the treatment of mental illness and substance use to include Tri-State area health care workers. The increased stress and uncertainty caused by the pandemic is exacerbating symptoms of mental illness and substance use disorders. The community’s health care workers are experiencing an unprecedented set of challenges as they face COVID-19, so their mental wellness and stability is even more critical.

With the amendment to the policy for the use of the fund, health care workers would be considered “First Responders” and may be eligible to receive financial assistance for mental health services at Lindner Center of HOPE.

Lindner Center of HOPE’s eleventh annual Touchdown for HOPE Super Bowl Sunday event at the Great American Ballpark Champions Club raised $195,000 for this patient assistance fund in February 2020.

Health care workers and first responders can contact Lindner Center of HOPE for outpatient services, (including partial hospitalization programs, intensive outpatient programs, Neuromodulation services, medication assisted treatment and outpatient appointments) and residential treatment services and share their health care role. Costs outside of insurance coverage would be eligible for funds up to $5000 per six month period, as long as funds remain available. Lindnercenterofhope.org offers information regarding contacting the center for the listed services.

While funds are available, patient’s health care claims will be filed by Lindner Center of HOPE, accepting no patient co-pays. All fees may be considered for use of the funds.

Lindner Center of HOPE in Mason is a comprehensive mental health center providing excellent, patient-centered, scientifically-advanced care for individuals suffering with mental illness. A state-of-the-science, mental health center and charter member of the National Network of Depression Centers, the Center provides psychiatric hospitalization and partial hospitalization for individuals age 12-years-old and older, outpatient services for all ages, diagnostic services for all ages and short-term residential services for adults, outpatient services for substance abuse through HOPE Center North location and co-occurring disorders for adults and research. The Center is enhanced by its partnership with UC Health as its clinicians are ranked among the best providers locally, nationally and internationally. Together Lindner Center of HOPE and UC Health offer a true system of mental health care in the Greater Cincinnati area and across the country. The Center is also affiliated with the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine.

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Lindner Center of HOPE to Host Second Webcast of 2020 Series

 

Quarterly free webcasts offer one free continuing education credit per session

Lindner Center of HOPE is hosting a webcast titled Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) vs Radically Open Dialectical Behavior Therapy (RO DBT) presented by Brett Dowdy, PsyD, Lindner Center of HOPE, Chief of Psychological Services, and Laurie Little, PsyD, Director of Therapeutic Services, Sibcy House on Tuesday, May 12, 2020.

The webcast is the second of the Center’s Free 2020 Webcast Series. The series will cover a variety of topics chosen to increase understanding of mental health and addiction diagnosis and treatment.

Following the webcast, Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the clinical population best suited for DBT and RO DBT
  2. Discuss the core similarities between DBT and RO DBT
  3. Analyze the differences in treatment approaches and learn how to target clinical referrals.

Visit https://lindnercenterofhope.org/dbtvsrodbt-webcast/ for more information and to register.

The series is offered quarterly. Login opens at 5pm with presentation from 5:30 -6:30. Other topics for the series include:

The remaining webcasts include:

Residential Stabilization, Diagnostic Assessment and Treatment to Optimize Patient Outcomes presented by William P. Hartmann III, MD FAPA, Medical Director, Williams House at Lindner Center of HOPE – Tuesday, August 11, 2020

Visit https://lindnercenterofhope.org/residential-stabilization-webcast/ for more information and to register.

 

OCD’s 10 biggest tricks and how to defeat them presented by Charles Brady, PhD, ABPP, Lindner Center of HOPE, Clinical Director of Outpatient Services and Staff Psychologist  – Tuesday, October 6, 2020

Visit https://lindnercenterofhope.org/ocd-tricks-webcast/ for more information and to register.

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Lindner Center of HOPE Announces 2020 Webcast Series

Quarterly free webcasts offer one free continuing education credit per session

Lindner Center of HOPE has released the 2020 schedule for their Free Webcast Series. The series will cover a variety of topics chosen to increase understanding of mental health and addiction diagnosis and treatment.

The first session in 2020 of the free series is February 11, 2020. Chris Tuell, Lindner Center of HOPE, EdD, LPCC-S, LICDC-CS, Lindner Center of HOPE , Clinical Director of Addiction Services, will present Screentime – When is it too much?

This session will cover understanding internet use disorder, the relationship between internet use disorder and mental illness, and the role of the addictive brain in the relationship to internet use disorder. Visit https://lindnercenterofhope.org/screentime-webcast/  for more information and to register.

The series is offered quarterly. Login opens at 5pm with presentation from 5:30 -6:30. Other topics for the series include:

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) vs Radically Open Dialectical Behavior Therapy (RO DBT)

presented by Brett Dowdy, PsyD, Lindner Center of HOPE, Chief of Psychological Services, and Laurie Little, PsyD, Director of Therapeutic Services, Sibcy House – Tuesday, May 12, 2020

Visit https://lindnercenterofhope.org/dbtvsrodbt-webcast/ for more information and to register.

  Residential Stabilization, Diagnostic Assessment and Treatment to Optimize Patient Outcomes presented by William P. Hartmann III, MD FAPA, Medical Director, Williams House at Lindner Center of HOPE – Tuesday, August 11, 2020

Visit https://lindnercenterofhope.org/residential-stabilization-webcast/ for more information and to register.

 OCD’s 10 biggest tricks and how to defeat them presented by Charles Brady, PhD, ABPP, Lindner Center of HOPE, Clinical Director of Outpatient Services and Staff Psychologist  – Tuesday, October 6, 2020

Visit https://lindnercenterofhope.org/ocd-tricks-webcast/ for more information and to register.

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August Session of Free Series to Explore Red Flags in Identifying Addictions

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                                                                     

CONTACT:
Jennifer Pierson
Lindner Center of HOPE
(513) 536 -0316
jennifer.pierson@lindnercenter.org

Session of Free Series to Explore Red Flags in Identifying Addictions

Free Community Education Series to Address Substance Use Disorders, Behavioral Addictions, Treatment and Strategies for Coping

August The seventh session of this free series to help increase understanding of addictions is August 16, 2017. Anna Guerdjikova, PhD, LISW, CCRC, Lindner Center of HOPE, Director of Administrative Services, Harold C. Schott Foundation Eating Disorders Program, will present on Red Flags in Addiction Identification.

Lindner Center of HOPE with the support of Manor House in Mason, Ohio is offering a Free Community Education Series in 2017 on topics related to addiction. The series will offer expert discussion of Substance Use Disorders, Behavioral Addictions, Treatment and Strategies for Coping for community members seeking information.

The series is held at Manor House, 7440 Mason-Montgomery Rd., Mason the third Wednesday of the month at 6 p.m. through November 15, 2017.

Register by calling Pricila Gran at 513-536-0318. Learn more by visiting lindnercenterofhope.org/education.

Lindner Center of HOPE in Mason is a comprehensive mental health center providing excellent, patient-centered, scientifically-advanced care for individuals suffering with mental illness. A state-of-the-science, mental health center and charter member of the National Network of Depression Centers, the Center provides psychiatric hospitalization and partial hospitalization for individuals age 12-years-old and older, outpatient services for all ages, diagnostic and short-term residential services for adults and adolescents, outpatient services for substance abuse through HOPE Center North location and co-occurring disorders for adults and research. The Center is enhanced by its partnership with UC Health as its clinicians are ranked among the best providers locally, nationally and internationally. Together Lindner Center of HOPE and UC Health offer a true system of mental health care in the Greater Cincinnati area and across the country. The Center is also affiliated with the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine.

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New Program Offers Intensive Assistance to Families with an Adolescent Struggling with Eating Disorders

Parents of adolescents (ages 12 to 17) struggling with Anorexia Nervosa or Bulimia Nervosa are often on a difficult journey as they attempt to care for their child. This journey can often cause parents to question their parenting and their ability to successfully help their loved one. The Proximi Recovery Eating Disorder Program (PREP) is uniquely designed to meet the daily needs of these struggling families through home, school and community assistance from a trained therapist.

Evidence-based research indicates that Family Based Therapy (Maudsley) is the most-effective first-line treatment for adolescents fighting an eating disorder (EDO). This type of therapy works to keep the family unit together. PREP provides committed families access to a therapist every day of the week to provide consultation, education, training and support through a combination of office visits, phone calls and in-home and family meal sessions. This program will allow the therapist to join the family as a consultant in the battle against the eating disorder, while empowering parents to manage authentic situations that arise. This intensive 24-week program includes:

  • Initial 2-hour evaluation
  • Initial 1-hour nutrition assessment and meal planning with registered dietitian
  • One 50-minute office-session per week with the therapist
  • One 1.5 to 2 hour in-home mealtime session per week
  • One 50-minute in-school or in-community mealtime session per week
  • One daily phone consultation with parents ( 5 to 10 minutes a day, up to 60 minutes weekly)
  • One 30-minute follow-up registered dietitian session per month (5 sessions total)
  • As warranted, consultation/collaboration with all pertinent patient care providers (ie primary care physician, psychiatrist, school personnel, dietitian, or other specialists)
  • A protocol pamphlet and other education materials and assignments
  • Pre and post testing to measure change
  • Post program follow up sessions, three 30-minute sessions at 6, 12 and 18 months post –program
  • Assistance in obtaining follow-up services in traditional outpatient therapy, if needed

The Proximi Recovery Eating Disorder Program provides comprehensive EDO treatment that involves every core component of the adolescent and family’s life. This private-pay program is intended to answer the quest for support from those families feeling at a loss when their adolescent is discharged to home amidst a pattern of revolving doors between admissions and discharges. With proper education and training, families can work together to prevent readmissions and successfully manage the eating disorder in the home.

For more information or to schedule an initial evaluation, call Scott K. Bullock, MSW, LISW-S, CEDS, PREP Founder and Therapist at 513-536-0724.

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Lindner Center of HOPE Outpatient Addictions Program Achieves Behavioral Health Opioid Treatment Accreditation From The Joint Commission

GoldSeal_transparentLindner Center of HOPE today announced it has earned The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval® for Behavioral Health Opioid Treatment Accreditation by demonstrating continuous compliance with its performance standards. The Gold Seal of Approval® is a symbol of quality that reflects an organization’s commitment to providing safe and effective care.

Lindner Center of HOPE, specifically in its Outpatient Addictions Program, HOPE Center North (4483 State Route 42, Mason), underwent a rigorous onsite survey on May 19 and 20, 2016. During the review, compliance with behavioral health care standards related to several areas, including care, treatment, and services; environment of care; leadership; and screening procedures for the early detection of imminent harm was evaluated. Onsite observations and interviews also were conducted.

Established in 1969, The Joint Commission’s Behavioral Health Care Accreditation Program currently accredits more than 2,250 organizations for a three-year period. Accredited organizations provide treatment and services within a variety of settings across the care continuum for individuals who have mental health, addiction, eating disorder, intellectual/developmental disability, and/or child-welfare related needs.

“Joint Commission accreditation provides behavioral health care organizations with the processes needed to improve in a variety of areas related to the care of individuals and their families,” said Tracy Griffin Collander, LCSW, executive director, Behavioral Health Care Accreditation Program, The Joint Commission. “We commend (name of organization) for its efforts to elevate the standard of care it provides and to instill confidence in the community it serves.”

“Lindner Center of HOPE is pleased to receive Behavioral Health Opioid Treatment Accreditation from The Joint Commission, the premier health care quality improvement and accrediting body in the nation,” added Paul E. Keck, Jr., MD, President and CEO, Lindner Center of HOPE. “Staff from across the organization continue to work together to develop and implement approaches and strategies that have the potential to improve care for those in our community. We believe this sets us apart in our approach in the fight against heroin and other opioids.”

The Joint Commission’s behavioral health care standards are developed in consultation with health care experts and providers, quality improvement measurement experts, and individuals and their families. The standards are informed by scientific literature and expert consensus to help organizations measure, assess and improve performance.

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The Joint Commission

Founded in 1951, The Joint Commission seeks to continuously improve health care for the public, in collaboration with other stakeholders, by evaluating health care organizations and inspiring them to excel in providing safe and effective care of the highest quality and value. The Joint Commission accredits and certifies nearly 21,000 health care organizations and programs in the United States. An independent, nonprofit organization, The Joint Commission is the nation’s oldest and largest standards-setting and accrediting body in health care. Learn more about The Joint Commission at www.jointcommission.org.

Lindner Center of HOPE offers comprehensive outpatient services for the treatment of substance use disorders at its HOPE Center North location, 4483 State Route 42, Mason. Included in these services are outpatient, Intensive Outpatient, and Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT). MAT is the use of medications, in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies, to provide a whole-patient approach to the treatment of substance use disorders. Research shows that when treating substance use disorders, a combination of medication and behavioral therapies is most successful.