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Crossing the Line: From Dual Diagnosis to Complex Comorbidity

Crossing the Line: From Dual Diagnosis to Complex Comorbidity

A deeper and wider approach to patient care.

2.25 CME/CEU offered

Wednesday, October 13, 2021

12-2:30 pm EST

Virtual Webcast Event

 

Summary of topic:

Virtually all psychiatric disorders co-occur with other mental health conditions, medical issues and at times addictions. With this knowledge it has been noted that patient populations now reflect complex comorbidity rather than just dual diagnosis or co-occurring. Put simply, patients consistently exhibit three or more significant challenges to their well-being. This presentation will high­light the importance of identifying complex comorbidity in order to improve patient outcomes.

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An introduction to Radically Open Dialectical Behavior Therapy (RO DBT) – Webcast

1 CME/CEU OFFERED. NO FEE.

TUES., October 12, 2021
5:30 – 6:30 p.m. EST
For a free webcast
An introduction to Radically Open Dialectical Behavior Therapy (RO DBT)

 

PRESENTED BY: Brett Dowdy, PsyD, Lindner Center of HOPE, Chief of Psychological Services, and Laurie Little, PsyD, Director of Therapeutic Services, Sibcy House

 

REGISTRATION: https://lindnercenterofhope.org/introductiontorodbt-webcast/

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OCD in Disguise:  Lesser Known Subtypes of OCD and Sometimes Surprising Presentations. 1 CME/CEU OFFERED. NO FEE.

REGISTER NOW!

Please join us Tues., August 10, 2021
5:30 – 6:30 p.m. EST

For a free webcast

OCD in Disguise:  Lesser Known Subtypes of OCD and Sometimes Surprising Presentations. 1 CME/CEU OFFERED. NO FEE.

PRESENTED BY:
Jennifer Wilcox, PsyD, Lindner Center of HOPE, Staff Psychologist

Click here for flyer

Register here

Target Audience:
Psychiatrists, Primary Care Physicians, Non-psychiatric MDs, Nurse Practitioners, Social Workers, Psychologists, Registered Nurses, Mental Health Specialists and interested parties as well

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Lindner Center of HOPE Announces Chief Patient Experience Officer

July 7, 2021 – Mason, Ohio – As part of Lindner Center of HOPE’s priority emphasis on patient experience, Paul Crosby, MD, Lindner Center of HOPE, President and CEO, has named Brett Dowdy, PsyD, Lindner Center of HOPE, Chief of Psychological Services, to the newly created, executive level position of Chief Patient Experience Officer. The responsibilities of the new position include developing, implementing, supervising, coordinating, aligning, and sustaining the highest level of patient experience. Dr. Dowdy’s work will also involve significant collaboration with Human Resources on workforce support and engagement, the cornerstone of any successful patient experience effort. Dr. Dowdy will also assume responsibility for Residential Services at the Executive Team level.

Dr. Dowdy will continue to serve as Chief of Psychological Services.  He has been with Lindner Center of HOPE since the facility opened in 2008 and has gained a reputation as an excellent clinician, serving on the residential units and in the outpatient practice.  A skilled leader, Dr. Dowdy has been instrumental in establishing and maintaining a therapist corps that is highly trained and highly skilled in providing the most effective and up-to-date psychotherapeutic interventions available.

Dr. Crosby said, “I can think of no one better to shepherd our growing organization’s approach to patient experience and to guide our nationally recognized residential services.”

Lindner Center of HOPE in Mason is a comprehensive mental health center providing excellent, patient-centered, scientifically-advanced care for individuals suffering with mental illness. A state-of-the-science, mental health center and charter member of the National Network of Depression Centers, the Center provides psychiatric hospitalization and partial hospitalization for individuals age 12-years-old and older, outpatient services for all ages, diagnostic services for all ages and short-term residential services for adults, and research. The Center is enhanced by its partnership with UC Health as its clinicians are ranked among the best providers locally, nationally and internationally. Together Lindner Center of HOPE and UC Health offer a true system of mental health care in the Greater Cincinnati area and across the country. The Center is also affiliated with the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine.

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Free Community Education Series – Healing Invisible Wounds in a Pandemic

Date/TimeAugust 18, 2021
6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Click here to register

Manor House
7440 Mason-Montgomery Road – Mason

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Lindner Center of HOPE Announces New CEO

Paul CrosbyEffective July 1, 2021, Paul R. Crosby, MD, MBA has assumed the role of Chief Executive Officer of The Frances and Craig Lindner Center of HOPE, the comprehensive mental health center of excellence in Mason, Ohio, which opened in 2008. Dr. Crosby’s full title is President and CEO, with the responsibility of providing leadership and direction for the overall operation of the Center.

Dr. Crosby, Associate Professor and Executive Vice Chair of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine and summa cum laude graduate of The Ohio State University, was recruited to join the Lindner Center of HOPE medical staff for the Center’s opening in 2008.  As a people-first physician leader with expertise in healthcare operations and policy, Dr. Crosby is guided by the values of empathy and excellence.  He drives results by combining his clinical experience with sound business principles.  He played significant, strategic roles in the growth and development of Lindner Center of HOPE, taking on more responsibility over time and serving in progressively more complex roles: Chief of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical Director of Lindner Center of HOPE Professional Associates, Chief Medical Officer, Chief Clinical Officer, and Chief Operating Officer (COO). In September 2020, Dr. Crosby was appointed President and officially began an organized process to succeed outgoing CEO, Paul E. Keck, MD.  Dr. Keck was LCOH’s founding president and CEO and will remain employed at the Center in the new role of Psychiatrist in Chief.

Dr. Crosby’s leadership has brought achievements in clinician recruitment and retention, multiple surveys by regulatory and accrediting bodies, and restructuring of Lindner Center of HOPE’s nationally-renowned residential services resulting in increased referrals, increased census, and increased patient and referrer satisfaction.  He led LCOH’s pandemic response including coordination of communications, establishment of safety best practices rapid conversion to telehealth of most outpatient services, and rapid transitioning to working-from-home for many staff. Notably, throughout the pandemic, the Center has not instituted layoffs or furloughs, pay reductions, or capacity reductions.  He is a recipient of The Healthcare Leadership Award, Venue and LEAD Magazine, Cincinnati, and a 2021 winner of the Cincinnati Business Courier’s Healthcare Hero’s Award in the manager category.

Dr. Crosby is board certified in Adult, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and has provided care in many of the Center’s service lines, including residential services, inpatient adolescent services, and partial hospital programs.  He will continue to provide outpatient psychiatric consultation to children and families referred from around the country.

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Clinical and Research Advances from The Research Institute at Lindner Center of HOPE

Lindner Center of HOPE Chief Research Officer member of team that identifies 64 regions of the genome that increase risk for bipolar disorder

Mason, OH, April 22, 2021 – Chief Research Officer of The Research Institute at Lindner Center of HOPE, Susan McElroy, MD, was part of a research team in the largest genetic study of bipolar disorder to date.  In his genetic study researchers have identified 64 regions of the genome containing DNA variations that increase risk of bipolar disorder—more than double the number previously identified.

The research team also found overlap in the genetic bases of bipolar disorder and other psychiatric disorders. Furthermore, the study supports a role of sleep habits, alcohol, and substance usage in the development of bipolar disorder, although further research is needed to confirm these findings. The study results were published May 17 in Nature Genetics (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41588-021-00857-4). Read the full press release at https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-05-regions-genome-bipolar-disorder.html .

 

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Obesity and binge eating: a disrupted clock in our body?

A UC, Lindner Center of HOPE study investigates the role of the circadian clock in obesity and eating behavior

The clocks on our walls, on the lock screens of our phones and attached to our wrists drive most actions in our lives. Time determines when we have to go to bed or wake up in the morning, when we need to be in class or at work and even when we feel the need to eat breakfast, lunch or dinner.

We also have inner, cellular clocks in most tissues of our body that are coordinated by a master circadian clock in the brain. These clocks form our circadian system that triggers some of these needs and responses, like getting tired and feeling hunger.

Now, researchers at the University of Cincinnati and the Lindner Center of HOPE are hosting a unique clinical trial to see if readjusting the circadian system of people with binge eating behavior can help in understanding more about why this occurs and develop new treatment options in the future. Scientists are using tabletop lamps and melatonin supplements to test their theory.

Binge eating behavior is a form of disordered eating characterized by excessive food consumption with a loss of control, causing a person to overeat in a relatively short period of time.

The associated Binge Eating Disorder, or BED, is characterized by recurrent episodes, without the compensatory behaviors observed in bulimia nervosa, meaning purging afterward. BED is the most prevalent eating disorder worldwide and affects an estimated 2.8 million people in the United States. It is frequently observed in individuals with obesity and those with other psychiatric diagnoses, like mood and anxiety disorders. Many are unaware that they have BED, and it remains undiagnosed. Additionally, treatment options are very limited.

Francisco Romo-Nava, MD, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences at UC, associate chief research officer for the Research Institute at the Lindner Center of HOPE and a UC Health physician scientist, says little is known about how the circadian system in these patients impacts their eating patterns.

Francisco Romo-Nava Psychiatry

“The circadian system makes it possible for our body to adapt to day and night periods, which has profound effects on physiology and behavior beyond regulation of sleep and wake cycles,” he says. “The most powerful signals that synchronize our circadian system are the presence of daylight and the production of melatonin at night, which is the chemical signal of darkness.

“The circadian system is different for each person. For example, some people work better during the day while others do so at night. Some people skip breakfast, while others eat a large meal to start the day. Recent studies suggest that the circadian system may be involved in regulating our food choices, the time at which we eat and how much we eat. However, the involvement of the circadian system in disordered eating behavior, such as binge eating behavior, is not well understood.”

Romo-Nava says preliminary research has shown that those with binge eating disorder may have circadian system abnormalities, and that by targeting this system in the body, new interventions and treatments may be available for patients.

In this study, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health and housed at UC’s Lindner Center of HOPE, researchers will compare the circadian system function in 80 adults with obesity, 40 with binge eating disorder and 40 without, for two weeks. Participants will complete a sleep and eating behavior diary and wear a device — a watch — that measures activity patterns.

Their circadian phases will be assessed by determining surges in melatonin concentrations at the specific point in time when their brains and bodies shift into “night mode.”

Romo-Nava says, traditionally, studies such as this involved costly and inconvenient in-hospital or sleep lab assessments of melatonin concentrations in saliva samples under dim lights, mimicking dusk, to detect the time of the surge in melatonin production at night.

However, in this study, researchers are using a new approach, where participants can collect the saliva samples easily at home in a dimly lit room.   

Finally, researchers will test whether or not they can resynchronize study participants’ circadian system over the course of a month by combining morning light, mimicked by tabletop lamps, and the administration of a fixed dose of melatonin or placebo at night. The melatonin is given at times that are individualized according to each participants’ circadian phase. This phase of the study will only be conducted on individuals who have been diagnosed with binge eating disorder.

“We want to evaluate if this method can be an individualized way to study the circadian system in this condition,” Romo-Nava says. “But ultimately, we want to advance our understanding of the role of the circadian system in binge eating disorder, and this study will provide valuable insight on its potential as a new therapeutic target. We’re excited about how this could positively impact patients with binge eating disorder in the future.”

More about the study

Participants without binge eating will be paid up to $215 for completing four study visits that involve assessments and laboratory studies. Participants with BED will be paid up to $440 for completing study procedures, which also include an intervention study phase and a total of eight study visits. Payments will be made at the end of each study visit with a prepaid debit card. For more information, contact Brian or George at (513) 536-0707 or fill out a prescreening questionnaire.

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Lindner Center of HOPE’s Associate Chief Research Officer Receives Distinction for Recent Research Poster

Francisco Romo-Nava, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Chief Research Officer, Research Institute at Lindner Center of HOPE, has been distinguished as a 2021 International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) Best Poster Awardee, for his poster Revisiting the Bipolar Disorder with Migraine phenotype: Clinical Features and Comorbidity. His poster is the effort of the team at The Research Institute. The program committee reviewed almost 200 posters, and Dr. Romo-Nava’s was rated among the highest. The best poster awardees will be recognized with a ribbon on the poster image in the poster gallery, listed in the General Conference Information and will also be acknowledged in the email that will be sent out to all registered attendees to launch the poster session each day.

This is the ISBD’s 23rd annual conference. It is a global conference taking place via interactive platform May 13-15, 2021.

Lindner Center of HOPE in Mason is a comprehensive mental health center providing excellent, patient-centered, scientifically-advanced care for individuals suffering with mental illness. A state-of-the-science, mental health center and charter member of the National Network of Depression Centers, the Center provides psychiatric hospitalization and partial hospitalization for individuals age 12-years-old and older, outpatient services for all ages, diagnostic services for all ages and short-term residential services for adults, and research. The Center is enhanced by its partnership with UC Health as its clinicians are ranked among the best providers locally, nationally and internationally. Together Lindner Center of HOPE and UC Health offer a true system of mental health care in the Greater Cincinnati area and across the country. The Center is also affiliated with the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine.

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Lindner Center of HOPE Professional Development Recognition

Lindner Center of HOPE has a Professional Development Staff Reward Program to recognize those employees (within patient care units, the Access and Referral Center, Partial Hospitalization Program and/or Neuromodulation Center) who exhibit performance and behaviors that meet and exceed criteria established for staff development. Criteria for the acknowledgement falls within the four categories of:  customer service, professional development, creativity and innovation, and teamwork. Points are awarded for criteria met within each of the categories. Based on the number of points accumulated by an employee, there are four tiers for designation. Tier IV is the highest level of designation. Rewards are given based on tier designation.

Recently, Brittany Heuer-MHS and Alexis Pitzer-MHS received Tier IV designation.

Congratulations to Brittany and Alexis on their achievement.

Brittany Heuer-MHS
Alexis Pitzer-MHS