Hope thrives on the energy and passion of people.

The promise of hope for people with mental illness is at the heart of the mission at Lindner Center of HOPE. HOPE for patients and families suffering with mental illness comes in many forms – through expert medical care, compassionate nursing, inspirational stories of resiliency, volunteerism, and financial support for needed programs and important research. Everyone has an opportunity to give HOPE.


Remembering Sarah LCOH-Donate-Man_Middle More Than a Diagnosis


The Real Impact of Mental Illness.

Though most everyone at some point in their lives will be touched by mental illness, this is a fact that is seldom acknowledged or addressed. Mental illness can be an uncomfortable topic, but it shouldn’t be. Keeping conversations about it behind closed doors is doing much more harm than good.

Mental illness ranks among the leading causes of disability in the world.

Mental illness is not just our country’s #1 public health problem.

The Global Burden of Disease project, conducted by the World Health Organization and the Harvard School of Public Health, found that 5 of the top 10 causes of disability worldwide were due to a psychiatric disorder. These disability rates were due principally to lack of access to effective treatment, and were projected to remain high well into this century because of inaccessibility of treatment.

Click below to Donate Now

Thank you for your decision to make a gift to Lindner Center of HOPE.

By clicking above you can access our online giving site.

If you wish to make a credit card payment by phone, please call the Development Office at:

513-536-0328.

Or, if you prefer to make a gift by mail, please send your check to:
Lindner Center of HOPE
Development Office
4075 Old Western Row Road
Mason, OH 45040


To view our 5 yr. Executive Report, click here.


Mental Illness Statistics

Since its opening, the multi-disciplinary staff has provided inpatient and outpatient services to over 70,000 individuals and families.

Depression, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Alcoholism and Traumatic Brain Injury are the most common causes of casualties in the wars our country is fighting; and last year suicides accounted for more deaths than combat.

Research shows that early diagnosis improves a patient’s rate of recovery. In addition, since genetics can play a role in mental illness, early screenings may help patients understand their possible risks.