FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions About Admissions

What are admission criteria for acute inpatient care/hospitalization?
How long will I have to stay?
What should I pack for my stay?
What’s the difference between inpatient care and residential care?
When will I know my diagnosis?
What will my schedule look like?
What can I expect during a group therapy session?
What can I expect after discharge?
How much experience do staff members have in dealing with my issue?
What access will I have to family and friends?
How long can visitors stay?
What are meals like?
Are visitors able to eat with me?
Can I smoke?
Will someone introduce me to other patients?
How much free time will I have?
Can I contact my friends and family by phone?
How am I discharged?
Once I am home, what do I do to stay well?


What are admission criteria for acute inpatient care/hospitalization?

An individual admitted to a Lindner Center of HOPE patient care unit will have a principal diagnosis of a psychiatric disorder, excluding sex offender, criminal court, end-stage dementia, mental retardation, or sole substance abuse disorder. In addition, patients will meet at least one of the following criteria:

  • Demonstrates a danger to self, others or property.
  • Manifest major impairment in activities of daily living and in occupational functioning.
  • Demonstrates continued decline in functioning manifested by impairment in ability to provide for his/her basic physical needs.
  • Condition prevents him/her from benefiting from less intensive levels of care.

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How long will I have to stay?

There are many factors unique to each patient that determine how long an individual is hospitalized on an acute unit. The goal is to make sure patients are discharged once they are stable and ready to transition either back home or to another appropriate treatment setting.

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What should I pack for my stay?

For safety reasons, please pack only essential items including:

  • Five to seven changes of casual, comfortable clothing (Laundry facilities are available for use.)
  • Five to seven changes of undergarments and socks
  • Shoes (including a pair of gym shoes)
  • Pajamas, slippers and robe
  • Sweater
  • Grooming items

View restricted items list.

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What’s the difference between inpatient care and residential care?

Inpatient Care: An individual admitted to a Lindner Center of HOPE inpatient acute care unit will have a principal diagnosis of a psychiatric disorder, excluding sex offender, criminal court, end-stage dementia, mental retardation, or sole substance abuse disorder. In addition, patients will meet at least one of the following criteria:

  • Demonstrates a danger to self, others or property.
  • Manifest major impairment in activities of daily living and in occupational functioning.
  • Demonstrates continued decline in functioning manifested by impairment in ability to provide for his/her basic physical needs.
  • Condition prevents him/her from benefiting from less intensive levels of care.

For the patient’s safety, the unit is kept locked and patients are closely monitored by staff at all times. The goal of inpatient care is stabilization and a return to basic functioning. Most insurance companies offer some coverage for acute inpatient care.

Residential Care, like Sibcy House: Residential Care as provided by Sibcy House at Lindner Center of HOPE provides a private and therapeutic environment for the diagnosis and treatment of persons with mental illness and those with mental health and addiction related issues. The unit treats persons over the age of 18 who have the ability to provide financial resources for their stay. Private pay for this kind of care eliminates restrictions sometimes placed on care by third-party payers. The first step is a comprehensive diagnostic assessment, unrestricted by a third-party payer, that enables the treatment team to generate a very individualized and tailored treatment plan for the individual. Once treatment begins, patients can discuss their individual treatment stay with their treatment team and determine appropriate next steps.

Sibcy House is an open treatment environment and patients are voluntary and do not need acute services or stabilization. The expected length of stay for the intensive diagnosis is 6 days and the longer residential stay is 28 days.

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When will I know my diagnosis?

You will receive ongoing feedback from your treatment team as it becomes available. Before discharge, we will give you a comprehensive explanation of your diagnosis and treatment plan. You are encouraged to ask questions at any time during your stay.

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What will my schedule look like?

Your daily schedule will vary but will typically include individual and group sessions. Sessions may include cognitive and dialectical behavioral therapies as well as nutrition, substance abuse, anxiety, trauma, living skills, relapse prevention and spiritual enrichment. Since maintaining a regular exercise program is important to well-being, fitness activities will be offered as a part of your schedule.

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What can I expect during a group therapy session?

In group therapy, most often led by psychologists, you will have the opportunity to support other guests in a confidential environment. Many find it comforting to hear that others are facing similar difficulties or have already worked through problems you may be experiencing.

You should feel free to contribute but will not be pressured to do so. During group therapy you’ll learn many new skills that will be beneficial to you after you leave.

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What can I expect after discharge?

Every patient has a unique life experience related to their struggle with mental illness and they come to our program at various points in their personal journey. As such, clinicians approach each person individually, offering the most appropriate diagnostic tools and treatments. During your stay, you will begin to implement your treatment including medication management, individual and group therapies. Our goal is for you to leave with an accurate diagnosis and the tools you need to live a successful and enjoyable life.

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How much experience do staff members have in dealing with my issue?

An extensive search was conducted to hire clinical care providers on the units. Each staff member has the experience and the compassion to work with every patient and their individual needs and circumstances.

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What access will I have to family and friends?

Family and friends are welcome to visit. Recommended visiting hours are between 6:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. Visitors will be asked to check in at the Welcome Center where they must provide an access code that you provide to them. Visitors will be asked to put purses or handbags in a secure locker provided for them. Once on the unit, they will need to check in with the main desk to have any items they’ve brought with them approved.

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How long can visitors stay?

A visit of longer than two hours should be discussed in advance with the treatment team. Visitors should be kept to a number that does not disturb others. If the visit is moved into a patient’s room, the number of visitors should be kept to four or less, and we require that the door to the room be kept open. At times it may be necessary to limit visitation to maintain unit safety. Visitors under 18 will be supervised by a responsible adult. This includes being within view, and in listening distance, of all conversations.

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What are meals like?

You will enjoy your meals in the dining room although there may be times that you will eat in the common area on the unit. You’ll make your own selections from our chef-prepared menu items. A dietitian is available to assist you with specific dietary requirements or requests. Snacks are available at the nurses’ station but food cannot be eaten or stored in your room. Food or drinks brought into the unit must be approved by a treatment team member.

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Are visitors able to eat with me?

Yes, as long as it is deemed appropriate by your treatment team. Visitors may purchase meals from the dining room to eat with you.

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Can I smoke?

Lindner Center of HOPE is smoke-free. If you would be interested in initiating a smoking cessation program during your stay we would be glad to assist you.

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Will someone introduce me to other patients?

Yes, you will be introduced to other patients. You will also get to know them during group sessions and meals. We find that Lindner Center of HOPE patients are very supportive of one another.

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How much free time will I have?

Prepare to be busy. The goal is to assist you in stabilization and prepare you to transition back home or to another appropriate treatment setting.

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Can I contact my friends and family by phone?

As approved by unit staff, you will be able to talk to loved ones by phone.

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How am I discharged?

When it is time for you to return home, your treatment team will provide you with a discharge plan including instructions for ongoing care. If you do not have a psychiatrist, therapist and support group in place, we will help you with this and make certain all of your appointments are scheduled before you leave. We will also make certain that the treatment plan started at Lindner Center of HOPE will be continued in the outpatient setting. Before you leave we will also give you any needed prescriptions.

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Once I am home, what do I do to stay well?

We want you to leave feeling you have the skills to remain well and to live a fulfilling and productive life. While being treated at Lindner Center of HOPE, you will learn relapse prevention techniques, including medical management and coping skills, to help you prepare for returning home. Please feel free to call us, if you have any questions or concerns.

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